31. október 2017

Open lecture: A new conceptual framework for the deep roots of magma-driven geothermal systems

A new conceptual framework for the deep roots of magma-driven geothermal systems

By Samuel Scott, post-doctoral researcher in the Operations Research and Subsurface Modeling group at Reykjavik University

Open lecture at ÍSOR – Iceland GeoSurvey on Thursday Nov 2, 2017 at 13.00
In room Víðgelmir, Grensásvegur 9, 108 Reykjavík

Recent developments in numerical simulation tools allow new insights into natural phenomena occurring in the deep roots of magma-driven geothermal systems, including the formation of supercritical geothermal resources, boiling and condensation processes, and the dynamics of heat transfer from intrusions. In this talk, I will present a number of recent studies which employ the Complex Systems Modeling Platform (CSMP++) to investigate the thermo-hydraulic structure of high-enthalpy geothermal systems. The ability to include a transiently cooling magmatic heat source in numerical simulations permits significantly improved methods of resource and sustainability assessment, and provides a virtual test bed to explore scenarios for supercritical resource exploitation. I compare model predictions with the measured characteristics of the IDDP wells in Krafla and Reykjanes, and offer tentative suggestions for future exploration strategies. 

Samuel Scott  is post-doctoral researcher in the Operations Research and Subsurface Modeling group at Reykjavik University, seeking to quantify uncertainty in subsurface systems and apply Bayesian inference to geothermal reservoir models.
He recently completed his PhD at ETH Zurich under the supervision of Thomas Driesner, and previously completed a Master's degree at the University of Iceland under the supervision of Andri Stefánsson and Stefán Arnórsson.

All are welcome.